Posts filed under ‘Civil Engineering Jobs’

Civil Engineers: Are You An Ambivert?

There was a recent article posted on line from the Washington Post titled, “Why extroverts fail, introverts flounder and you probably succeed.”  The article was written by Daniel H. Pink; author of “To Sell is Human:  The Surprising Truth About Moving Others.”

The gist of the article revolved around the mentality of successful sales people, comparing extroverts to introverts and learning which of those personality traits experienced the most sales success.  Specifically noted by the author was a meta-analysis of 35 studies of 4,000 sales people.  This analysis revealed limited parallels between extroversion and sales success.

“The conventional view that extroverts make the finest salespeople is so accepted that we’ve overlooked one teensy flaw: There’s almost no evidence it’s actually true”

Of course, the opposite does not hold true either, but no one expected that, right?

The article referenced  recent study done by the University of Pennsylvania tha identified the fact that the most successful sales people were actually ambiverts; that is, someone with a personality falls between the stereotypical engineer with taped glasses and a pocket protector crunching calculations behind a computer screen all day and a bull in a china shop.

Introver Extrovert

I have spoke to my fair share of civil engineering executives and leaders that have risen to the top of their organization, and like in most professions, many of the most successful executives are the ones that have a track record of successfully generating strong revenues and growing business.  I can honestly tell you that what Pink discussed in this article generally holds true for the civil engineering profession; that is, the most successful civil engineers who have risen to the ranks of executive/principal leadership as a result of their ability to haul in business are more often than not ambiverts.

Here are a few ideas as to why ambiverts in the civil engineering profession achieve great sales success and rise to the top:

A.  They don’t get too high on their wins and they don’t beat themselves down when they lose to the competition.  As a leader, these traits set a great example for those beneath and keeps the ship afloat.  They are for the most part enjoyable to be around and develop a sense of loyalty from their team and are well liked by their clients for their ability to be even keeled.

B. They understand their own organization, as well as clients, and have the wherewithal to understand the extrovert and introvert in everyone. They are capable of appealing to both introverts and extroverts, on both sides of the table, which often leads to win-win scenarios for everyone involved.

C.  They are great listeners and are relatively humble. Outspoken professionals who pitch, pitch, pitch their services and why their company is so great without taking the time to sit back and listen to the client do not get very far.  Boasting about your past successful projects proves nothing unless you are first willing to listen.  So they do share successes with the clients and how they have solved problems in the past, and they are excited to, but they first listen to make sure those past examples actually relate.  They are not just well-groomed sales people merely full of glossy marketing materials and power points on their ipads.  They actually are capable of talking a good game because they have played on the field.  They are then able to take their experiences, along with their ingenuity, and effectively communicate to clients in a manner that shows they understand.

In two words:  Humbly Confident.

Based upon  your experience in the civil engineering profession, would you agree or disagree that it is the ambivert that achieves the most success?  Why?  What other ambivert traits do you feel lead a civil engineer down the path of success?


Matt Barcus
President, Precision Executive Search, Inc
Managing Partner, CivilEngineeringCentral.com
View Matt’s profile & connect with him on LinkedIn

civil engineering jobs :: civil engineering resumes :: civil engineering blog :: civil engineering discussion

February 7, 2013 at 3:46 pm 1 comment

Civil Engineering Firms Stretched Thin

As I was perusing the different headlines  at CNN.com the other today a headline grabbed my attention:

“We Are Working Too Hard.”

And as I leaned back in my chair for a moment reading this piece, I began to wonder, “is it time for civil engineering firms to adjust the notches on their belt and loosen up a little?”

Take a look at what the commentary’s author, Paul La Monica noted:

doing more with less“Bob Baur, chief global economist for Principal Global Investors in Des Moines, Iowa, noted that U.S. workers may be reaching the point where they are stretched too thin…at some point, U.S. corporations need to recognize that they can’t keep trying to do more with less…”

The idea of “doing more with less” is nothing new, but if I had a dime for each time I heard this phrase as a result of the recession I could retire…today!   The concept is not a bad idea, but at some point you have to draw the line. Seriously.  Remember the days when your Land Development or Highway group was made up of a Vice President who was mainly responsible for business development; a Department Head who assisted with business development but also managed the Project Managers and kept their finger on the pulse of all the projects and clients; Project Managers managing projects making sure they got out the door within schedule and within budget; a Project Engineer;  a designer and a cad tech?    As civil engineering consulting firms have been fighting to stay afloat many of them have slimmed down their business structures where a department now  may be made up of a “Seller-Doer” and Project Engineer where the “Seller-Doer” is a Vice President/Department Manager/Project Manager all rolled up into one, and the Project Engineer is the Project Engineer/Designer/Cad Tech all rolled up into one.  So now you have two professionals scrambling to handle the responsibilities of what was previously in the laps of six.  They are doing more with less.  But it may be time to loosen up the purse strings a little and invest in some new help.

We recently completed a search for a client of ours, a local consulting engineering firm, who was looking for a Project Manager for their Land Development group.  The local market was improving and development was beginning to pick up.  overworkedThe President was still struggling with some of the uncertainty in the air and quite frankly, found it difficult to be optimistic after being in the dumps for so long.  But he listened to his employees.  They were becoming overwhelmed with hours, they were stretched thin, and stress was beginning to set in.  The “doing more with less” mentality was beginning to take its toll, but he recognized that and made the decision to bring on another Project Manager…a decision that was welcomed by his staff, in turn easing the burden on them, resulting in a happier group of campers.

So you adjusted to the economy and have implemented the “do-more-with-less” philosophy, but as the economy begins to improve, is that same philosophy beginning to take its toll?  Is it now time to re-adjust your philosophy?

If you are a business owner or executive and can relate, or an employee who has been in the trenches with this philosophy in place, please let us know and share your experience with our audience on this topic.


Matt Barcus
President, Precision Executive Search, Inc
Managing Partner, CivilEngineeringCentral.com
View Matt’s profile & connect with him on LinkedIn

civil engineering jobs :: civil engineering resumes :: civil engineering blog :: civil engineering discussion

December 12, 2012 at 10:29 am 12 comments

How to Make the “Age Issue” a “Non-Issue” When Searching for a New Civil Engineering Job

George Burns

Age to me means nothing. I can’t get old; I’m working. I was old when I was twenty-one and out of work. As long as you’re working, you stay young. When I’m in front of an audience, all that love and vitality sweeps over me and I forget my age.” – George Burns

So last week I authored a blog titled, “From Civil Engineer to…,” which discussed some of the different careers civil engineering professionals have transitioned into as a result of being laid off in the midst of this recession.  We posted this blog on dozens of LinkedIn discussion boards that generated some lively conversation and we learned of a number of folks who are now doing something new.  For those that have been able to find an opportunity again within the profession, we uncovered that many of them are making less than they were prior to being laid off.  But a reoccurring theme within those discussions came from those engineers with 35+ years of experience; they are frustrated with what they see as age discrimination, and as a result are not being hired…or even considered for hire.  I am not here to fight the age discrimination battle as I have no desire to, nor do I have the credentials.  But I would like to use this opportunity to challenge those who are 55+ (and those who are on their way)  to help them become more marketable so that any thought of age discrimination is thrown out the window.   Here is a sampling of some of the comments that I extracted from the elder statesmen of the civil engineering community on the discussion boards:

“It seems like such a waste that the industry has tossed so many engineers and lost a generation of knowledge and mentoring. On a more personal level, I am frustrated, feeling that two educations are not being used and that I have lost some prime earning years. “We” have always been told get a science degree or two and it will be OK, you will always be employed and live the dream. Well, that isn’t true.”

“I haven’t gone anywhere…..I am still here, water and wastewater consulting experience of 30+ years. Trying to sell my services as a sole proprietor to prospective clients, or as an experienced client manager to professional services firms is about as rewarding as selling refrigerators to Eskimos”

“However, as is obtained nowadays employers are increasingly bypassing more experienced civil engineers for younger just out of school candidates and expecting them to do senior /experienced engineer work only because they fear they can’t pay more highly experienced engineers. However they should not fear experience;”

“I am presently working with a group of seasoned professionals that can handle just about any problem with little direction. What a difference in the caliber of design product! The client knows and appreciates that quality and I am confident they will continue to use our service. Managers should be aware of the value of that quality and the little comparative cost difference as a percentage of the entire project, it represents. “

“Companies were happy to have me a few years ago, but the work seems to have dried up now I have turned 60″

“Maybe its time to start a consultancy employing only over 60s…and show the kids we’ve still got it!”

As most of you know, I have made a career out of recruiting civil engineering professionals, and these same frustrations are often conveyed to me by those professionals in the 55+ crowd.  That said, I have also been successful in placing professionals who merely based upon their graduation dates or the gray hair on their head may be considered to be “over the hill.”    Here are some of the single traits that I have found that makes these “silver-haired” experts look “platinum” :

PLATINUM:  They take good care of themselves physically and still find time exercise on a regular basis.  When they arrive for meetings they still wear a suit…with a tie.
SILVER:  They have “let themselves go” and believe that their breadth of experience is all that matters.
POINT BEING:  Looks and presentation do  matter, and first impressions are often, well, first impressions.

PLATINUM:  They have somehow found a way to keep that “fire” burning in their belly.  They continue to search for creative solutions and opportunities to differentiate themselves, and their companies, from the competition.
SILVER:  They are stuck in their old ways and believe if something worked just fine a decade ago it will work fine today.  They are looking to ride slowly off into the sunset.
POINT BEING:  Companies and clients want innovation; they want someone who is continuously looking for ways to make things even better. They want people who enjoy taking on challenges and have the continued desire to learn and grow.

PLATINUM:  They are very active in their local and national associations.  That is, they seek out opportunities to present to their professional community, and when given those opportunities they are engaging and memorable.  They keep up with their network and with networking…in good times and in bad.
SILVER:  They limit their professional interaction to those that surround them in the office and at client meetings.
POINT BEING:  You’ve heard of old adage, “location, location, location,” right?  Same concept.

PLATINUM:  They are flexible.  That is, they are open to relocation, travel, or TDY.
SILVER:  9-5, no longer than a 30 minute commute, not willing to travel.
POINT BEING:  The more flexible you are, the more opportunities exist.

PLATINUM: They have become experts in niche services (i.e. rail/transit, tunneling, process engineering, long-span bridge, ITS, green infrastructure, etc) that are subsets of a broader industry focus.  They have mastered the art of Project Execution Delivery / Program Management / Operations / Business Development.
SILVER:  They continue to hold Project Manager roles on bread-and-butter projects.
POINT BEING:  Do you know how many Land Development Project Managers there are?

PLATINUM:  They are mentors; and memorable and effective ones at that.
SILVER:  Focuses purely on themselves.
POINT BEING:   People you mentor will remember you when opportunities arise.  Business owners will hire you to mentor their younger staff so they can more on driving sales.  Companies will hire you to fill the gap between the existing aging leadership and the next generation of leaders. Catch my drift?

PLATINUM:  They have found / earned their way into larger and higher profile projects which increase their industry exposure…and they have experienced success.
SILVER:  They are constantly content and show no desire to grow or be challenged.
POINT BEING:  Are you a tortoise running a marathon, or are you a rabbit looking for the next sprinting race? And if you are the tortoise in the marathon, are you willing to turn on the after-burners from time-to-time?

It’s no secret that there are plenty of companies out there who shy away from hiring those professionals with “too much experience (wink, wink).”  And for or many companies, there are valid reasons why they are not willing to hire someone with 35+ years of experience.   No matter what the perception or reality may or may not be on this topic, my desire is to share some of my insight that comes from nearly 16 years of experience in recruiting AEC professionals.  With all the “platinum” and “silver” in this blog, my hope is that I have provided you with a little nugget of GOLD that may make a difference for you or someone you know.

And in line with  the quote at the beginning of this blog, may vitality sweep over YOU and may potential employers forget about YOUR age.

Comments and lively discussion  always welcome.


Matt Barcus
President, Precision Executive Search, Inc
Managing Partner, CivilEngineeringCentral.com
View Matt’s profile & connect with him on LinkedIn

civil engineering jobs :: civil engineering resumes :: civil engineering blog :: civil engineering discussion

December 5, 2012 at 10:43 am 7 comments

From Civil Engineer to…

With the recent recession beginning to fade further  in the rear view mirror, many civil engineering firms are struggling to find available talent.  As the economy improves and we are beginning to conduct searches in regions or specialty areas (i.e. land development) that we have distanced ourself from over the past few years, we have found that many of the civil engineering professionals we used to network with on a  regular basis have disappeared into thin air.  Not really.  But they have left the civil engineering consulting industry in order to make ends meet after being laid off.   Rather than scouring the country for available opportunities only to compete with dozens of other candidates who share their same story, they chose to do something different.  So without further ado, here are some great examples that we have unearthed from our national network of civil engineering professionals…

…they have gone from civil engineer to:

  • Middle School Science Teacher
  • Pastor
  • Youth Minister
  • Attorney
  • Leather Apparel / Accessory Manufacturer and Retailer
  • Real Estate Agent
  • Home Remodeling Contractor / Business Owner
  • Microbrewery Owner
  • Equipment Manufacturing Sales Rep
  • Civil Engineering Software Sales Rep
  • Corporate Real Estate Development

Most, if not all of these people were FORCED out of the industry and had no other options. But as a result, they uncovered new skills and a new passion for something completely different that provides food for the family, and for some, food for the soul!

I would not wish the unemployment line on anyone,
as I know it can be an extremely difficult life challenge.

Maybe they had one foot out the door anyway regarding
their level of interest in their civil engineering career, but none-the-less,
these people made lemonade out of lemons.

Please share with our readership any career transitions that you or your civil engineering peers have made as a result of being laid off. Was it worth it? Or was that transition just a stop gap until such a time that a suitable opportunity presents itself back in civil engineering? Please let us know, we would love to hear from you!

Authored by:


Matt Barcus
President, Precision Executive Search, Inc
Managing Partner, CivilEngineeringCentral.com
View Matt’s profile & connect with him on LinkedIn

civil engineering jobs :: civil engineering resumes :: civil engineering blog :: civil engineering discussion

November 27, 2012 at 5:48 pm 13 comments

Raise the Bar for Engineering

Engineers of decades past have had more credit hours required of them compared to the engineers of today, yet engineers of today have so much more to learn than those engineers of past generations.  As a result, there is a new campaign supported by the likes of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), and the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) that is catching fire:

RAISE THE BAR FOR ENGINEERING

If you have not noticed, many engineering companies these days are requiring Masters Degrees for any candidates they consider for current or future jobs.  Why?  Today’s engineer can no longer rely solely on a Bachelors Degree and senior civil engineering staff to teach them all the knowledge and technology necessary to be successful, because they do not always understand it all themselves.   The challenges of today’s civil engineering infrastructure are much more complex than in years past, and a Masters Degree in Civil Engineering allows the engineer of today  to be more prepared to take on those complex challenges.  Universities have the continued pressure to graduate their engineering undergrads in four years, but this will not provide the undergraduate civil engineer with the knowledge and skills to meet the demands of a Professional Engineer.

Carl Mack, Ph.D,  Executive Director for the National Society of Black Engineers says, “If you want to be competitive in this global environment, in this very changing and complex world, an undergrad degree just isn’t going to cut it.”

As you will hear in the video below, education beyond the undergraduate degree has been a requirement for every learned profession except engineering.  Professional Engineering is not setting the same standards as a doctor or lawyer or any other profession that requires an advanced degree; as a result, it is time to “Raise the Bar for Engineering.”   By increasing the educational requirements for the Professional Engineer, many experts agree that this will help boost the profession to the stature where it belongs.

Take a look at the following promotional video for this initiative:

An opposing opinion was left on the YouTube page where this video was found:

“This is a misguided initiative. There is certainly very little value an engineering Masters degree would provide the practicing engineer. Most Masters degrees, and even most Bachelors degrees, are research and theory based and provide little practical knowledge for the real world. On the job experience is more valuable. To compare our profession to doctors, lawyers, pharmacists, etc. is fair, but let’s be honest, there’s no way employers are going to pay at the same level as those professions.”

This initiative seems to make sense, as the impact that engineers make on our society is overlooked for no good reason.  Their talents and skills are critical to our world, so comparing them to attorneys or doctors from a stature standpoint I do not believe is off target.

What do you think?  Are you FOR or AGAINST this campaign?

To learn more, please visit http://www.raisethebarforengineering.org

Authored by:


Matt Barcus
President, Precision Executive Search, Inc
Managing Partner, CivilEngineeringCentral.com
View Matt’s profile & connect with him on LinkedIn

civil engineering jobs :: civil engineering resumes :: civil engineering blog :: civil engineering discussion

September 13, 2012 at 8:58 am 10 comments

Working From Home: The Kiss of Death for a Civil Engineer?

Is telecommuting limiting to the civil engineering professional?

A couple of weeks ago a consulting civil engineering client of mine offered an opportunity to an extremely talented candidate that would have allowed him to work from home for his first 6-8 months in order to accommodate some special circumstances.   The candidate ended up delaying the acceptance of the offer until the first quarter of next year as his situation would be fully resolved (hopefully the opportunity will still be available).  The details of the circumstances are neither here nor there, but at the end of the day this candidate determined that as flattered as he was that they would make special accommodations for him, he would not feel comfortable in a work-from-home situation as he would be “out of the mix.”   He is a team player and not having immediate access to his team, and the “perception” that he would not be giving 110% because of his physical absence he saw as a detriment.

Interestingly enough, I recently read an article on the Harvard Business Review website titled, Why Remote Workers Are More (Yes, More) Engaged, by Scott Edinger.

According to the article, remote employees were more engaged because:

1.  Proximity Breeds Complacency – that is, leaders who work in the same building, let alone the same floor, regularly fail to interact face-to-face with their employees, preferring rather to communicate via email.

2.  Absence Makes People Try Harder to Connect – that is, leaders are more deliberate in their communication with those off-site employees.

3.  Leaders of Virtual Teams Make a Better Use of Tools – that is, leaders are forced to use video-conferencing, instant messaging, and even the telephone, just to name a few; an advantage that their peers may not necessarily take advantage of by having everyone working in the office.

4.  Leaders of Far-Flung Teams Maximize the Time their Teams Spend Together – that is, since the time the team actually spends together on location is limited, when they do get together the level of focused attention is higher than it might be otherwise.

I do not necessarily doubt the findings and opinions of this article, but my question is, was the candidate in the experience that I alluded to at the beginning of this blog right in his decision?  Since we are dealing with a Civil Engineering consulting firm and considering that the candidate would be a full-time permanent employee with the title of Sr. Civil Engineer who is looking to continuously advance up the corporate ladder, I would say that, in as much as I was disappointed in the fact that he declined the offer,  he was probably correct.  And here is why:

1.  Knowing the determination and intelligence of the candidate, he could have successfully handled the situation.  But he felt that, especially with a new employer, he did not want to be perceived as a slacker.  Even though he would have given 110%, his absence from the office could easily be mis-construed.

2.  Part of his motivation for exploring a new opportunity was because in his current role, he lacked mentorship.  Working from home for at least six months would limit the mentoring opportunities available to him.

3.  Working from home for a large civil engineering consulting firm as a project engineer often makes it difficult to grab people, share ideas, ask questions, and bounce concepts off of peers and managers “on the fly.”

4.  Out of sight, out of mind.  Enough said.

Unless you are a regional or national business development executive who is jet-setting all week, or a technical engineer who is completely satisfied with maintaining a long-term technical engineering role with no real advancement, you are better off  working at the office as opposed to remotely from home.

Does your firm allow for work-at-home opportunities on a regular basis?  Have you been part of a positive work-from-home experience?  Have you seen people fail in work-at-home situations with their employers?   I look forward to hearing you share your thoughts and experiences on this topic as a civil engineer.

Finally, if you are on LinkedIn, please click on the following link to take our following “one-click” poll on this topic:

http://linkd.in/OUO66f

Authored by:


Matt Barcus
President, Precision Executive Search, Inc
Managing Partner, CivilEngineeringCentral.com
View Matt’s profile & connect with him on LinkedIn

civil engineering jobs :: civil engineering resumes :: civil engineering blog :: civil engineering discussion

August 30, 2012 at 10:04 am 10 comments

Civil Engineering Firms and Hiring Retired Military

This week I was thrilled to hear a Client say “My ideal candidate would be someone who was in a leadership role in the Army Corps of Engineers, Navy, etc.” Throughout my 20+ years as an executive recruiter for the civil engineering industry,  I have usually heard the opposite. US civil engineering firms have tended to seek executive candidates who have run or are running other competitor consulting firms. It is certainly not politically correct to say, but I recall hearing “let someone else train those candidates what it means to make money and stay on budget. We don’t have the luxury to do so.”

It seems that there are stronger arguments to be offered for hiring retired/ex military. Traditionally, these are people who have been given assignments, challenges and missions with direction to accomplish them. They must succeed under unique circumstances, overcoming difficult obstacles.  They have been trained how to lead and how to motivate teams not only on a group level but an individual one.  These candidates can bring a unique and fresh perspective to the corporate climate.

To tell a retired Colonel who has successfully lead significant programs and large teams while navigating difficult terrain, that he isn’t the best candidate to run a civil engineering department, has been difficult and often frustrating. During this period of civil engineering rebuilding, I hope to see new perspectives on hiring retiring military!

What has been your experience?

By Carol A. Metzner
President, The Metzner Group, LLC and
Managing Partner, A/E/P Central, LLC home of CivilEngineeringCentral.com
  View Carol’s profile & connect with her on LinkedIn

civil engineering jobs :: civil engineering resumes :: civil engineering blog :: civil engineering discussion

August 28, 2012 at 10:48 am 2 comments

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